A laboratory for learning awaits us here.

Endgame

Through life’s journey we may reflect on and refine our decisions.  Life is a game, but not one of chance.  It is a struggle for balance, simplicity, interdependence and goodwill.  The process of learning the game of chess even still is experimental and is really a laboratory for learning the game of life.  The endgame has no end in sight.  We are very new to the aging services community, but truly feel the wonderful game of chess can and will benefit families and groups.

Family administered, Chess Made Fun provides and promotes opportunity, exploration and adventure by creating inter-generational learning environments for families and groups. Through areas of specialized and applied learning, Chess Made Fun enables active participation in primary and secondary education and in care for the aging.  Chess Made Fun develops social mentoring programs that utilize proven learning frameworks in metacognition (learning to learn) to adjust and build on what groups can do naturally. With this idea in mind Chess Made Fun provides an alternative to caregivers, parents, professional educators and advocates through community outreach, local event planning and facilitation.

Chess Made Fun provides innovative recreational products and services tailored to individual, intergenerational and family health interventions that are therapeutic and meaningful. The evolution of gaming culture combined with interventions that address health needs allow us develop unique programs that integrate various applications, venues and delivery methods.  The company also plays an active role to fight cognitive dysfunction and memory loss in aging communities with particular attention to stronger and lasting family bonds.  We are members of a rapidly growing group of organizers who encourage and promote the advancement of cognitive & memory care services throughout the world.  The family began playing chess in 2009 and feel they’ve begun an adventure they can share with others.

Chess is therapy for the mind, body and soul and is being unearthed in a new and balanced way.

Chess is therapy for the mind, body and soul and is being unearthed in a new and balanced way.
Photograph by Richard Powers

Face it!  Chess is therapy for the mind, body and soul.  We know we will have an opportunity to learn more from each other.  We learn from people in various developmental stages in their lives. What they can do naturally always amazes us, and as such a spiritual journey continues.  A strong “breakthrough energy” is realized and the power of the game becomes a gateway to understanding the natural world.

This is an original program for creating intergenerational bonds that we feel are so important with an increasingly aging society that will soon be lost.  We intend to stay active through various media with researchers in recreation therapy, educational psychology, geriatrics and the emerging field of neuroanthropology which seeks to connect culture to brain function and explain this interaction.

The game’s enduring principles have been handed down through tireless generations in search for what lies beneath the surface in so many aspects of our lives.

If you have a taste for intrigue, or learning about chess for the very first time (we hope you are), we encourage you to explore the game of chess through a Canadian television series released in 2011 called Endgame.  Shown in the series as a set of  “life lessons”, we hope you enjoy Endgame as much as we have.  Chess offers a lifetime of opportunity to learn, enjoy and teach this truly remarkable game.

A laboratory for learning awaits us here.

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2 responses

  1. Hello, I saw recently where you are following our blog. I write the blog as part of a Culture Change Project in Arkansas, we have several homes in our project that are doing very innovative activities with residents. Keep up the good work, as you saw in our June Blog, Dr. Power and Dr. Taylor are working to shed new light on cognitive problems.

    Like

    July 13, 2012 at 8:16 pm

  2. I just recently began learning to play chess online with my son who lives 3500 miles away. 🙂 I’m very green at it but he is a patient teacher. Your mission sounds wonderful!

    Thanks for stopping by my site and “liking” it.

    Like

    July 3, 2012 at 11:50 pm

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